Fortune Magazine, with the Great Place to Work Institute and Hewitt Associates, probed 206 of more than 1,000 large and midsized firms, and polled some 27,000 of their employees, to identify the very best places to work and how they got that way. Factors involved in the selection include compensation, industrial relations and business practices. The list also considers the level of trust, pride, and camaraderie that employees share with management and their peers, and what practices the company is pursuing to sustain those things.

A composite of the typical 100 Best company is a drawn from the medians of several categories. It is 36 years old and has a U.S. work force of 5,520. It had 1997 revenues of $1.3 billion and a CEO with an eight-year tenure. Its work force is 44% female, 78.2% Caucasian. A third of employees have been on the job less than two years, with 6% more than 15 years. Last year it received 19,000 job applications, adding 724 jobs.

 

Compare this to the 100 Best Companies list compiled by Robert Levering and Milton Moskowitz

Rank 
Company
City
Rank
Company
City
 1  SYNOVUS FINANCIAL  Columbus, Ga  51  COMPUWARE  Farmington Hills, Mich.
 2  TDINDUSTRIES  Dallas  52  K2  Vashon Island, Wash.
 3  SAS INSTITUTE  Cary, N.C.  53  AMGEN  Thousand Oaks, Calif.
 4  SOUTHWEST AIRLINES  Dallas  54  BUREAU OF NATL. AFFAIRS  Washington, D.C.
 5  SCITOR  Sunnyvale, Calif.  55  STARBUCKS  Seattle
 6  PEOPLESOFT  Pleasanton, Calif.  56  GENENTECH  South San Francisco
 7  GOLDMAN SACHS  New York  57  ERIE INSURANCE  Erie, Pa.
 8  DELOITTE & TOUCHE  Wilton, Conn.  58  ENTERPRISE RENT-A-CAR  St. Louis
 9  MBNA Wilmington, Del.   59  COMPUTER ASSOCIATES  Islandia, N.Y.
 10  HEWLETT-PACKARD  Palo Alto  60  BE&K  Birmingham, Ala.
 11  EDWARD JONES  St. Louis  61  LENSCRAFTERS  Cincinnati
 12  FINOVA GROUP  Phoenix  62  LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES  Murray Hill, N.J.
 13  AFLAC  Columbus, Ga.  63  SUN MICROSYSTEMS  Palo Alto
 14  FIRST TENNESSEE BANK  Memphis  64  JOHNSON & JOHNSON  New Brunswick, N.J.
 15  FRANK RUSSELL  Tacoma  65  USAA  San Antonio
 16  WRQ  Seattle  66  WAL-MART STORES  Bentonville, Ark.
 17  JANUS  Denver  67  MEDTRONIC  Minneapolis
 18   A.G. EDWARDS  St. Louis  68  INGRAM MICRO  Santa Ana, Calif.
 19  ACXIOM  Conway, Ark.  69  BAPTIST HEALTH SYSTEMS  Coral Gables, Fla.
 20  W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATES  Newark, Del.  70  FOUR SEASONS HOTELS  Toronto
 21  KINGSTON TECHNOLOGY  Fountain Valley, Calif.  71  MERRILL LYNCH  New York
 22  J.M. SMUCKER  Orrville, Ohio  72  ALAGASCO  Birmingham, Ala.
 23  JM FAMILY ENTERPRISES  Deerfield Beach, Fla.  73  ENRON  Houston
 24  CISCO SYSTEMS  San Jose  74  ARROW ELECTRONICS  Melville, N.Y.
 25  UNUM  Oortland, Me.  75  ERNST & YOUNG  New York
 26  TIMBERLAND  Stratham, N.H.  76  LANDS' END  Dodgeville, Wis.
 27  MICROSOFT  Redmond, Wash.  77  HARLEY-DAVIDSON  Milwaukee
 28  MERCK  Whitehouse Station, N.J.  78  PUBLIX SUPER MARKETS  Lakeland, Fla.
 29  PLANTE & MORAN Southfield, Mich.   79  FEDEX  Memphis
 30  GREAT PLAINS  Fargo, N.D.  80  ALLIED SIGNAL  Morristown, N.J.
 31  GUIDANT  Indianapolis  81  ACIPCO  Birmingham, Ala.
 32  LUCAS DIGITAL  San Rafael, Calif.  82  QUANTUM  Milpitas, Calif.
 33  GRANITE ROCK  Watsonville, Calif.  83  W.W. GRAINGER  Lincolnshire, Ill.
 34  ODETICS  Anaheim, Calif.  84  S.C. JOHNSON  Racine, Wis.
 35  AUTODESK  San Rafael, Calif.  85  CERNER  Kansas City, Mo.
 36  CDW  Vernon Hills, Ill.  86  ALCON LABORATORIES  Fort Worth
 37  VALASSIS COMMUN.  Livonia, Mich.  87  HERMAN MILLER  Zeeland, Mich.
 38  REI  Kent, Wash.  88  UNION PACIFIC RESOURCES  Fort Worth
 39  FENWICK & WEST  Palo Alto  89  WORTHINGTON INDUSTRIES  Columbus, Ohio
 40  CONTINENTAL AIRLINES  Houston  90  HONDA OF AMERICA MFG.  Marysville, Ohio
 41  CAPITAL ONE  Falls Church, Va.  91  KINKO'S  Ventura, Calif.
 42  OHIO NATL. FINAN. SVCS.  Cincinnati  92  APPLIED MATERIALS  Santa Clara, Calif.
 43  WEGMANS  Rochester, N.Y.  93  QUAD/GRAPHICS  Pewaukee, Wis.
 44  MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL Washington, D.C.   94  3M  Maplewood, Minn.
 45  J.D. EDWARDS  Denver  95  3COM  Santa Clara, Calif.
 46  BMC SOFTWARE  Houston  96  INTERFACE Atlanta 
 47  QUALCOMM  San Diego  97  BALDOR ELECTRIC  Fort Smith, Ark.
 48  WHOLE FOODS MARKET  Austin, Texas  98  NORDSTROM  Seattle
 49  INTEL  Santa Clara, Calif.  99  CORNING  Corning, N.Y.
 50  PATAGONIA  Ventura, Calif.  100   L.L. BEAN  Freeport, Me.

Source: Fortune Magazine, January 1999

 

 

More than 70 percent of all American women between the ages of 20 and 54 now work outside the home. The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 guarantees family leave for employees under certain circumstances. The FMLA requires private sector employers of 50 or more employees and public agencies to provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave to "eligible" employees for certain family and medical reasons. Employees are "eligible" if they have worked for a covered employer for at least one year, and for 1,250 hours over the previous 12 months, and if there are at least 50 employees with 75 miles. Similar provisions may apply to federal and congressional employees.

For more information on the new federal regulations, contact the nearest office of the Wage and Hour Division, listed in most telephone directories under U.S. Government, Department of Labor, Employment Standards Administration. The following state regulations augment and supersede the federal requirements for employers:

Alaska

Alaska's family leave law provides state and other public employees with up to 18 weeks of leave every 24 months to care for the serious health condition of a child, spouse, or parent, or for the worker's own serious health condition. Additionally, the law provides 18 weeks of leave per year to care for a newborn or newly adopted child. It covers the state and political subdivisions of the state with at least 21 employees. Workers must work at least 35 hours per week for six consecutive months or 17.5 hours per week for 12 consecutive months to be eligible.

California

California's family leave law provides up to 16 weeks of leave over two years for birth or adoption, or for the serious health condition of a child, spouse, or parent. It applies to employers of 50 or more; employees must be employed for 12 months to be eligible.

Colorado

Colorado provides employees guarantees of a "reasonable period" of leave for pregnancy, child-birth, and adoption.

Connecticut

Connecticut provides 16 weeks of family and medical leave every two years for employers of 75 or more.

Employees must be employed for 1,000 hours in the 12-month period preceding the first day of leave to be eligible. Connecticut also provides state employees with a total of 24 weeks over two years for family or medical leave.

Connecticut's pregnancy disability law provides job-guaranteed leave for the period that a worker is physically disabled due to pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions. The law covers employers with three or more employees; certain family businesses are exempted.

Delaware

Delaware provides state employees who have had one year of continuous employment with six weeks of family leave for adoption or birth of a child.

District of Columbia

The District of Columbia's family and medical leave law provides up to 16 weeks of unpaid leave every two years to care for a newborn or newly adopted child or for a seriously ill family member. "Family member" is defined broadly to include a person related by blood, legal custody, or marriage, or a person with whom an employee shares a residence in the context of a committed relationship. Sixteen weeks of medical leave every two years is separately available for the employers of 50 or more for the first three years after enactment; covers employers of 50 or more for the first three years after enactment; covers employers of 20 or more thereafter. Employees must have worked for the employer for at least 1,000 hours during the last 12 months to be eligible.

Florida

Florida law grants up to six months of family leave per year to state employees for birth or adoption or for the serious illness of a worker's spouse, child, or parent.

Georgia

Georgia provides up to 12 weeks of family and medical leave per year for state employees. Employees must be employed for at least 12 months and 1,040 hours to be eligible.

Hawaii

For state employees, and for private sector employers of 100 or more, Hawaii law provides employees four weeks of family leave for birth, adoption, or the serious health conditions of a child, spouse, or parent.

Hawaii also provides pregnancy disability leave to all employees for the period that a worker is physically disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

Illinois

Illinois provides certain permanent, full-time state employees with family leave of up to one year for "bona fide family responsibilities" (including birth or adoption, or care of a seriously ill family member).

Iowa

Iowa provides up to eight weeks' pregnancy disability leave. Employers with four or more employees are covered.

Kansas

Kansas provides pregnancy disability leave for the period that a worker is physically disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. Employers with four or more employees are covered.

Kentucky

Kentucky provides all employees with six weeks' leave for adopting a child under age seven.

Louisiana

Louisiana provides up to four months of leave to employees who are temporarily disabled because of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. Only six weeks of disability leave is generally available for normal pregnancy or childbirth. Employers with 26 or more employees are covered.

Maine

Maine provides ten weeks of family and medical leave over a two-year period. Employers with 25 or more employees are covered. Employees must work for the same employer for 12 consecutive months to be eligible.

Maryland

Maryland provides 12 weeks of leave for birth, adoption, or family illness for state employees.

Massachusetts

Female employees in Massachusetts are eligible for eight weeks of leave for birth or adoption of a child under age three. Employees are eligible after completing employer's initial probationary period or three consecutive months as a full-time employee. Covers employers of six or more employees.

Minnesota

Minnesota employers with 21 or more employees must provide their employees with six weeks of leave for the birth or adoption of a child. Employees must work 12 months at 20 or more hours per week to be eligible.

Missouri

Missouri provides equal leave for childbirth and adoption for state employees.

Montana

Montana provides pregnancy disability leave for workers when temporarily disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. Covers employers with one or more employees.

New Hampshire

New Hampshire provides pregnancy disability leave for workers when temporarily disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. Covers employers of six or more.

New Jersey

New Jersey provides 12 weeks of leave over a 24-month period for birth, adoption, or the serious health condition of a child, parent, or spouse. Employers of 50 or more are covered. Employee must have been employed at least 1,000 hours in the 12 months before the leave to be eligible.

New York

New York provides equal leave for childbirth and adoption.

North Carolina

North Carolina provides all state employees with pregnancy disability leave when temporarily disabled by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

North Dakota

North Dakota provides state employees (with one-year minimum employment at an average of 20 hours per week) our months of leave per year for birth, adoption, or serious health condition of spouse, child, or parent.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma provides state employees with 12 weeks of family leave per year for birth or adoption, or for the care of a critically ill child or dependent adult. Employees must work six months to be eligible.

Oregon

Oregon's family leave law provides employees with 12 weeks of leave every two years for the illness of a child requiring "home care," or to care for a child, spouse, or parent suffering from "any mental or physical condition requiring constant care." Covers employers with 50 or more employees.

Oregon's parental leave law provides 12 weeks of leave for the birth of a child or for adopting a child up to age 12. This law covers employers of 25 or more employees; employees are eligible after 90 days of employment. Employees hired on a seasonal or temporary basis are not covered. Oregon provides pregnancy disability leave for the period of physical disability if such leave can be reasonably accommodated.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island provides up to 13 weeks of family medical leave over a two year period. Covers private employers with 50 or more employees; city, town, or municipal agencies with 30 or more employees; and all state agencies. Employee must be employed for an average of 30 or more hours per week by same employer for 12 consecutive months to be eligible.

Tennessee

Tennessee provides up to four months of leave for pregnancy disability and childbirth. Covers employees who have worked full-time for 12 consecutive months at companies with 100 or more employees.

Texas

Texas provides state employees six weeks' leave for childbirth or adoption.

Vermont

Vermont provides 12 weeks of family and medical leave per year. Employers of ten or more must provide leave to care for a newborn or newly adopted child; employers of 15 or more must also provide leave to care for the serious health conditions of a child, spouse, or parent, or for the worker's own serious health condition. Employees must work for at least one year for an average of 30 hours per week to be eligible.

Virginia

Virginia provides state employees with six weeks of parental leave per year for birth or adoption.

Washington

Washington's parental leave law provides 12 weeks of leave over a two year period for the birth, adoption, or serious illness of a child. Employees must be employed 52 weeks at 35 or more hours per week to be eligible. Covers employers of 100 or more employees.

Effective October 28, 1973, Washington also provides pregnancy disability leave for the period of physical disability. Covers employees of eight or more.

West Virginia

West Virginia provides state and school employees with 12 weeks of leave per year for the birth or adoption of a child, or for the serious health condition of a spouse, child, or parent. Employees must have 12 consecutive weeks of employment to be eligible.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin provides six weeks of leave for birth or adoption of a child; two weeks of leave for serious health condition of a child, spouse, or parent; and two weeks of medical leave for a worker's own serious health condition (including pregnancy disability). No more than ten weeks may be taken in a 12-month period for any combination of these reasons. Law covers employers with 50 or more employees; an employee must be employed for 52 consecutive weeks and have worked 1,000 hours to be eligible.

 

What Is the NLRB?

The National Labor Relations Board is an independent federal agency created in 1935 by Congress to administer the National Labor Relations Act, the basic law governing relations between labor unions and the employers whose operations influence interstate commerce.

The statute guarantees the right of employees to organize and to bargain collectively with their employers or to refrain from all such activity. Generally applying to all employers involved in interstate commerce -- other than airlines, railroads, agriculture, and government -- the Act carries out the national labor policy of assuring free choice and encouraging collective bargaining for maintaining industrial peace.

Through the years, Congress has amended the Act, and the Board and courts have developed a body of law drawn from the statute. This section is intended to give a brief explanation of the Act to employees, employers, unions, and the public.

What Does It Do?

In its statutory assignment, the NLRB has two principal functions: (1) to find out, through secret ballot elections, the free democratic choice by employees about whether or not they wish to be represented by a union in dealing with their employers and, if so, by which union; (2) to prevent and remedy unlawful acts, called unfair labor practices, by either employers or unions.

The Act's election provisions provide the authority for conducting representation elections, which determine the views of the employees regarding representation by a labor union. It's unfair labor practice provisions place certain restrictions on actions of both employers and labor organizations in their relations with employees, and with each other.

The agency does not act on its own initiative in either function. It processes only those charges of unfair labor practices and petitions for employee elections which are filed with the NLRB in one of its Regional, Subregional, or Resident Offices.

The staff in each office is available to help the public with inquiries concerning the Act and to provide appropriate forms and other technical assistance to those who wish to file charges or petitions.

What Does the Act Provide?

  • The Act sets forth the basic rights of employees as follows:
  • To self-organize;
  • To form, join, or assist labor organizations;
  • To bargain collectively about wages and working conditions through representatives of their own choosing;
  • To engage in other protected "concerted activities," that is, to act together for purposes of collective bargaining, or other mutual aid or protection;
  • To refrain from any of these activities. (However, a union and employer may, in a state where such agreements are allowed, reach a lawful union security clause.)

The Act prohibits both employers and unions from violating these employee rights. As an example, an employer may not discriminate against employees regarding hiring, discharge, or working conditions because of their union activities. A union may not engage in acts of violence against employees who refrain from union activity. These example s are for illustration only.

For further information about employer and union unfair labor practices, refer to The National Labor Relations Board and You: Unfair Labor Practices, available from your nearest NLRB office. A related publication, The National Labor Relations Board and You: Representation Cases, describes the election process in more detail.

What Is the NLRB s Structure?

The agency has two separate components. The Board itself has five members and primarily acts as a quasi-judicial body in deciding cases based on formal records in administrative proceedings. Board members are appointed by the President to five-year terms, with Senate consent, the term of one member expiring each year. The general counsel, appointed by the President to a four-year term with Senate consent, is independent of the Board and is responsible for the investigation and prosecution of unfair labor practice cases and for the general supervision of the NLRB field offices in the processing of unfair labor practice and representation cases.

Each Regional Office is run by a Regional Director who is responsible for making the initial determination in unfair labor practice and representation cases arising within the geographical area served by the Region (including any Resident or Subregional Offices within the Region).

What Are the NLRB's Procedures?

Representation Cases

In a typical representation election case, a union employer or individual files a petition with the field office requesting that an election be held among a particular group of employees (called a "bargaining unit") to decide whether the group wishes to be represented, or wishes to continue to be represented, by a union. A petition filed by a union or an individual must be supported by showing that at least 30 percent of affected employees want an election.

If the Region's investigation reveals that the petition should be processed, attempts are made to secure the agreement of the parties on the issues involved, including the appropriate unit and the time and place of the election. Over 80 percent of meritorious election petitions result in such agreements. If an agreement cannot be reached, the Region conducts a hearing. Based upon the record of the hearing, the Regional Director issues a decision disposing of the issues. The Regional Director's decision may be appealed to the Board.

When an unfair labor practice charge is filed, the appropriate field office investigates to decide whether there is reasonable cause to believe the Act has been violated. If the Regional Director decides that the charge lacks merit, it will be dismissed, unless the charging party decides to withdraw the charge. A dismissal may be appealed to the General Counsel's office in Washington, D.C.

If the Regional Director finds reasonable cause to believe a violation the law has been committed, the Region seeks a voluntary settlement to remedy the alleged violations. If these settlement efforts fail, a formal complaint is issued, and the case goes to a hearing before an NLRB administrative law judge.

The judge issues a written decision which may be appealed to the Board for a final Agency determination That final determination is subject to review in the federal courts. More than 90 percent of the unfair labor practice cases filed with the NLRB are disposed of in an average of 45 days without the necessity of formal litigation before the Board. Only about 4 percent of the cases go on to Board decision.

Since its establishment, the NLRB has processed more than 90O,000 unfair labor practice charges and conducted in excess of 36O,000 secret ballot elections. The Agency handles approximately 4O,000 cases each year, including more than 7,000 representation petitions.

For further information, to find the NLRB field office nearest to you, or to receive copies of the publications referred to here, contact the NLRB headquarters at: The National Labor Relations Board Office of Information 1099 14th St., NW, Room 9400 Washington, D.C. 20570. Phone: (202) 273- 1991.

Other recommended information sources include:

The National Labor Relations Board and You: Unfair Labor Practices
National Labor Relations Board, free 
(202) 273-1991

Provides information about employer and union unfair labor practices.

The National Labor Relations Board and You: Representation Cases 
National Labor Relations Board, free 
(202) 273-1000

Describes the union election process in detail.

A Guide to Basic Law and Procedures Under the National Labor Relations Act 
U.S. Government Printing Office 
(202) 512-1800

 

Physical Examinations

Physical examinations can be used to screen out applicants when the results show that job performance would be degraded. For example, jobs that require a great deal of physical force may require job applicants to receive back X-rays, while desk jobs may not.

Drug Testing

Drug testing for employees and job applicants has increased 250 percent since 1987. Perhaps because of increased testing and related educational programs, drug use among workers and job seekers has declined in recent years.

A handful of states presently outlaw drug testing for private sector businesses. Many government workers, on the other hand, must submit to random or periodic drug testing as mandated by the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Regulations.

Just about all drug testing is done by urinalysis which, when performed under the guidelines established by the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Regulations, offers a 99.9 percent accuracy rate.

Polygraph Tests

With the passage of the Employee Polygraph Protection Act of 1988, employers are restricting their use of polygraph or lie detector tests. The law virtually outlaws the use of lie detectors for employment, and covers all private employers in interstate commerce. Supporters of the law claim that the tests are accurate only two-thirds of the time and are far more likely to be inaccurate for honest employees. The new law restricts pre employment screening and random use of the device.

The Employee Polygraph Protection Act allows polygraph tests to be used with jobs in security or that involve handling drugs, or in investigating a theft or other suspected crime. Before an employee can be required to take such a test as part of an investigation of an employment-related crime, however, the employee must be given a written notice saying that he or she is a suspect.

AIDS

Employees with disabilities, including AIDS and HIV infection, are protected by law from discrimination in employment. Often, HIV testing of new or present employees for employment is prohibited by human rights laws. In the very few areas of employment where testing may be allowed, an employee may never be singled out for testing; tests must be required of all employees or none.

Because of the many sensitive legal issues involving privacy and discrimination, it is advised that employers develop a comprehensive "AIDS in the Workplace" policy, and should not require HIV screening as part of pre-employment or general workplace physical examination.

More information on drug testing and program management can be obtained by getting in touch with these firms:

Drug Intervention Services of America
11200 Westheimer, Suite 630
Houston, Texas 77042
(713) 972-3472

National MRO
P.O. Box 261426
Lakewood, CO 80226
(303) 238-2000

Substance Abuse Management
2 Plaza E.
330 E. Kilbourn Avenue, Suite 1075
Milwaukee, WI 53202
(414) 273-7264

University Services
Arsenal Business Center
5301 Tacony Street, Building 4
Philadelphia, PA 19137
(215) 743-4200

Weber Consultants Unlimited
2331-D2 E. Avenue S., Suite 198
Palmdale, CA 93550
(805) 294-5033

 

Robert Levering and Milton Moskowitz did a study of companies in America with the aim of looking at them through the eyes of their employees. So they ranked them according to a variety of factors, including pay, benefits, job security, chances of advancement, and worker pride. The following is a list of 100 companies that they felt were the best to work for according to these criteria.

Compare this to the 100 Best Companies list compiled by Fortune Magazine

Company
City
3M St. Paul, MN
Acipco Birmingham, AL
Advanced Micro Devices Sunnyvale, CA
Alagasco Birmingham, AL
Anheuser-Busch St. Louis, MO
Apogee Enterprises Minneapolis, MN
Armstrong Lancaster, PA
Avis Garden City, NY
Baptist Hospital of Miami Miami, FL
BE&K Birmingham, AL
Ben & Jerry's Homemade Waterbury, VT
Beth Israel Hospital Boston Boston, MA
Leo Burnett Chicago, IL
Chaparral Steel Midlothian, TX
Compaq Computer Houston, TX
Cooper Tire Findlay, OH
Corning Corning, NY
Cray Research Eagan, MN
Cummins Engine Columbus, OH
Dayton Hudson Minneapolis, MN
John Deere Moline, IL
Delta Air Lines Atlanta, GA
Donnelly Holland, MI
Du Pont Wilmington, DE
A.G. Edwards St. Louis, MO
Erie Insurance Erie, PA
Federal Express Memphis, TN
Fel-Pro Skokie, IL
First Federal Bank of California Santa Monica, CA
H.B. Fuller St. Paul, MN
General Mills Minneapolis, MN
Goldman, Sachs New York, NY
W.L. Gore & Associates Newark, DE
Great Plains Software Fargo, ND
Hallmark Cards Kansas City, MO
Haworth Holland, MI
Hershey Foods Hershey, PA
Hewitt Associates Lincolnshire, IL
Hewlett-Packard Palo Alto, CA
Honda of America Manufacturing Marysville, OH
IBM Armonk, NY
Inland Steel Chicago, IL
Intel Santa Clara, CA
Johnson & Johnson New Brunswick, NJ
SC Johnson Wax Racine, WI
Kellogg Battle Creek, MI
Knight-Ridder Miami
Lands' End Dodgeville, WI
Lincoln Electric Cleveland, OH
Los Angeles Dodgers Los Angeles, CA
Company
City
Lotus Development  Cambridge
Lowe's North Wilkesboro, NC
Lyondell Petrochemical Houston, TX
Marquette Electronics Milwaukee, WI
Mary Kay Cosmetics Dallas, TX
McCormick Hunt Valley, MD
Merck Whitehouse Sta., NJ
Methodist Hospital Houston, TX
Microsoft Redmond, WA
Herman Miller Zeeland, MI
Moog E. Aurora, NY
J.P. Morgan New York, NY
Morrison & Foerster San Francisco, CA
Motorola Schaumburg, IL
Nissan Motor Manufacturing Smyrna, TN
Nordstrom Seattle, WA
Northwestern Mutual Life Milwaukee, WI
Odetics Anaheim, CA
Patagonia Ventura, CA
J.C. Penney Plano, TX
Physio-Control Redmond, WA
Pitney Bowes Stamford, CT
Polaroid Cambridge, MA
Preston Trucking Preston, MD
Procter & Gamble Cincinnati, OH
Publix Super Markets Lakeland, FL
Quad/Graphics Pewaukee, WI
Reader's Digest Pleasantville, NY
REI Seattle, WA
Rosenbluth Philadelphia, PA
SAS Institute Cary, NC
J.M. Smucker Orrville, OH
Southwest Airlines Dallas, TX
Springfield ReManufacturing Springfield, MO
Springs Fort Mill, SC
Steelcase Grand Rapids MI
Syntex Palo Alto, CA
Tandem Cupertino, CA
TDIndustries Dallas, TX
Tennant Minneapolis, MN
UNUM Portland, ME
USAA San Antonio, TX
US West Englewood, CO
Valassis Communications Livonia, MI
Viking Freight System San Jose, CA
Wal-Mart Bentonville, AR
Wegmans Rochester, NY
Weyerhaeuser Tacoma, WA
Worthington Industries Columbus, OH
Xerox Stamford, CT

Source: Robert Levering and Milton Moskowitz, The 100 Best Companies to Work For in America , Doubleday, 1993