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The following should not be considered medical advice and is presented for informational purposes only. Always consult a doctor for medical problems.

 

acetaminophen A painkiller and fever reducer used as a popular alternative to aspirin. It is often equally as effective but has fewer of the side effects of aspirin, such as stomach irritation. Acetaminophen can also be safely used by those allergic to aspirin.

alcohol A mild antiseptic or germ killer used topically.

ammonia For fainting, used as "smelling salts" by holding an open container under the victim's nose so vapor can be inhaled. Ammonia can also be used as a counterirritant and to neutralize insect bites.

aspirin A relatively safe, effective, and inexpensive painkiller and inflammation and fever reducer.

baking soda Used to neutralize acid burns.

benzalkonium chloride A detergent-type cleanser and disinfectant for treating wounds.

boric acid A weak germ and fungus killer, used as dusting powder.

burned toast Used as a substitute for activated charcoal.

calamine lotion Used for sunburn and minor thermal (heat) burns that do not result in blisters.

chloride of lime (bleaching powder) A disinfectant. Avoid direct contact with the wound.

coffee Used as a stimulant in shock cases if the victim is conscious and bleeding internally.

egg white Used as a demulcent to soothe the stomach and retard absorption of a poison.

epsom salts Dissolved in warm water, can be used in treating wounds and to make wet dressings for them.

flour Made into a thin paste, can be used as a demulcent to soothe the stomach and retard absorption of a poison.

hydrogen peroxide A germ killer when in direct contact with bacteria.

milk Used as a demulcent to soothe the stomach and retard absorption of a poison.

milk of magnesia Used sa a substitute for magnesium oxide. Milk of magnesia is also used in small doses as an antacid for stomach upset.

mineral oil Used as drops to treat thermal (heat) burns of the eye.

oil of cloves Used for temporary relief of a toothache.

olive oil Used as drops to treat thermal (heat) burns of the eye. Olive oil is also used as an emollient to soften skin.

petrolatum (Vaseline®) A skin softener and protective ointment used on wound dressings.

powdered mustard (dry mustard) Used as an emetic. Dissolve one to three teaspoonfuls in a glass of warm water.

soap suds (not detergents) Used sa an emetic and as an antidote for poisoning by certain metal compounds, such as mercuric chloride. Soap and clean water can also be used to cleanse wounds.

starch, cooked Made into a thin paste as a demulcent to soothe the stomach and retard absorption of a poison.

table salt Used as an emetic. Dissolve two teaspoonfuls in a glass of warm water. (Clean sea water can be used if an emetic or a wound cleanser is needed for an accident near an ocean beach.)

tea Made strong, used as a substitute for tannic acid. Tea is also used as a stimulant in shock cases when appropriate.

universal antidote Recommended as an antidote for poisoning when the poison cannot be identified. The universal antidote is made by mixing 1/2 ounce activated charcoal 1/4 ounce magnesium oxide or milk of magnesia, and 1/4 ounce tannic acid in a glass of water.

vinegar (acetic acid) Used to neutralize alkali burns.